Food & Nutrition Security & Livelihoods

/Food & Nutrition Security & Livelihoods
Food & Nutrition Security & Livelihoods 2019-04-11T00:52:13+03:00

Context

Food is central to human well being: it provides the body with nourishment, offers livelihoods that lifts people out of poverty, and brings communities together through cultural enrichment. We believe that food is a basic human right, yet too many people are trapped in a cycle of hunger by systemic forces beyond their immediate control like poverty, disaster, conflict, and inequality.

Despite progress in recent decades, about 795 million people – or around one in nine – still suffer from chronic undernourishment or hunger. When food is scarce, women are the first to go short, or even go without. The fact is that there is enough food in the world to feed everyone, but not everyone gets enough food to eat. There are three major factors leading to food & nutrition security: poverty prohibits people from buying food to feed themselves and their families; climate change affects food production, especially for small-scale farmers; and food waste and losses also contribute greatly to hunger. In the face of rising food insecurity, Rhac-Uganda is working in some of the Uganda’s most vulnerable communities to ensure that no one need die from hunger or suffer chronic malnutrition. Rhac-Uganda works to help people find sustainable ways to make sure they know where their next meal is coming from and support long-term methods of reducing their vulnerability to hunger and malnutrition. This includes supporting farming households to ensure local markets are well stocked, managing natural resources so that they are less at risk from the effects of climate change, and strengthening livelihoods so that people are able to purchase foods.

Malnutrition

2 million children suffer from malnutrition Uganda . At least 200 children under 5 years of age die from malnutrition every year. In many regions, poor nutrition is on the rise. Malnutrition affects every stage of life and can affect generations. Malnourished mothers are more likely to die in childbirth and have low birth-weight babies. Chronically malnourished children face lifelong consequences in reduced mental capacity, lower learning in school and reduced lifetime earnings. To address the causes of malnutrition,

Rhac-Uganda”s Nutrition project in Uganda is focused on empowering women to make their children healthier. We helped women start businesses, supported them to participate in decisions about their children’s education, and supported the creation of women’s groups to confront early marriage, violence against women and limits on women’s mobility. By the end of this project, nearly half of the women will have a say in decision about buying or selling household assets and child malnourishment plummeted by 28%. Women’s empowerment is the single most important strategy that will lead to this change.

This program is designed to provides food and nutritional support to vulnerable families. It will also address the underlying causes of poverty, including the lack of access to livelihoods, to clean water and sanitation hygiene, and lack of control over land and natural resources. We focus on reducing gender inequality because experience shows us malnutrition can be reduced when women are empowered.  We also work closely with government to make sure that they have the long-term political commitment, good policies and are allocating resources for lasting improvements.

  • Despite progress in reducing global hunger, more than 200 million people still go to bed hungry every night.

  • Those in poverty generally spend between 60 and 80 percent of their income on food.

  • Agricultural production will need to increase by 50 percent globally to support the world’s population in 2050.

What We Do

We can only tackle hunger if we’re committed to promoting food security and Livelihood,  to ensuring that families which are economically vulnerable are able to provide food to their children even during hard times especially prolonged dry spells which have of late become more often. We do these by providing vegetable seeds of nutritious vegetable to improve on the diet as well as selling of the accidental surplus to generate income. Vegetable farming an effective way to kickstart commercial agriculture. Though sometimes it takes creativity.

Our Early Childhood Development Program includes providing training packages on feeding infants to first time mothers, Food and Medical Aid to Malnourished children, Pregnant & Breastfeeding Mothers. We recognize the fact that Healthy growth minimizes cases of Illnesses in Children and promotes development of the immune system.

We provide the resources, knowledge and skills needed to access and utilize clean water, employ hygienic practices, and consume diverse and nutritious diets

Our Early Childhood Development Program includes providing training packages on feeding infants to first time mothers, Food and Medical Aid to Malnourished children, Pregnant & Breastfeeding Mothers. We recognize the fact that Healthy growth minimizes cases of Illnesses in Children and promotes development of the immune system.

We provide the resources, knowledge and skills needed to access and utilize clean water, employ hygienic practices, and consume diverse and nutritious diets

During crisis, we provide at-risk communities with life-saving assistance and the tools to reestablish healthy bodies and prosperous livelihoods.

 Supporting Farmers

Farmers hold the key to reducing hunger and poverty. Impoverished people rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. In fact, a 10% increase in farm yields has been shown to lead to a 7% reduction in poverty in Africa. Good governance, gender equality and resilience to climate change are interlocking themes of Rhac-Uganda’s  approach to strengthen sustainable, climate-resilient agriculture in the country. Rhac-Uganda helps farmers to increase agricultural productivity through training and support in improved techniques and practices. To help respond to climate change, we have developed participatory community-based adaptation approaches. To increase wages of female workers, we provide training and support to women farmers, promoting women’s participation in community groups, and increasing women’s access to and control over resources. We will start Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs) which help women save, start a business and get a loan, leading to empowerment and independence.